God

What thoughts do we have about God? Pause and think about that for a moment. Where can we look to find God?

Rudolf Steiner says that “We should not only think of God, we should think in such a way that God lives in our thoughts.”

This may mean that we edit our thoughts, they might not be appropriate for God! Actually, it is more about including God in our thoughts. “…allow God and the divine beings to be active within us, so that the forces of the spiritual world flow into our own deeds, into everything which we do in everyday life. “

As with all esoteric knowledge, it is about engaging in the process rather than the result.

“The time of mere belief in the spiritual world is past; it is no longer possible, at present, to be bone-lazy and to believe that we shall be saved by spiritual powers about whom we do not concern ourselves, confiding in the fact that they will do their best to save us: The essential point for the progress of human development is that we should not content ourselves with mere belief in God and in divine beings, but that we should allow God and the divine beings to be active within us, so that the forces of the spiritual world flow into our own deeds, into everything which we do in everyday life.

From morning to night, our actions should be done in such a way that a divine-spiritual power is contained in them. This spiritual power will only permeate our actions if it is contained, above all, in our thoughts. The task of modern humanity is to take in God’s essence not only as a content of faith, but as an active force. We should not only think of God, but we should think in such a way that God lives in our thoughts. This is the essential point! If we surrender to such an ideal, we shall surely develop the required interest in things for which the great majority of modern men unfortunately has shown no interest whatever during the past decades.” Rudolf Steiner “The Separation of the Moral-Spiritual Life From the External Realities of Existence” 1st February, 1919.

3 Responses

  1. Radical Non-Dualist

    It sounds as though you’re proposing a variation of the Buddhist idea of Right Thought, which is fine. But as soon as the idea of Right Thought is named, then the idea of wrong thought also appears, and I am immediately thrown into duality. The question then becomes: how do I resolve that duality? The usual approach recommended by many spiritual teachers is to focus on just the ‘Right Thought’ side of the duality. To borrow Rudolf Steiner’s criteria for right thoughts, they are supposed to be based on truth rather than opinion, and they should be eternal rather than transitory. So have you tried thinking any eternally true thoughts lately? It’s not that easy. I’m not arguing with the premise of your article. I’m just calling out that there is a duality here, and I’m asking what is the right way to resolve that duality. I’m not convinced that focusing solely on Right Thought is the best way to do that. The solution will probably have something to do with neutrally observing one’s thoughts so that the observer effect can come into play ..

    1. Kristina Kaine

      Excellent point. First we recognize the duality: right thought / wrong thought. Then we rise above these two to observe them objectively. This is the perspective of the Higher Self, the I AM. It is also pure thinking.

  2. Carolyn Meier

    Yes, I have been blessedly with
    Kundalini yoga practitioner and lectures on the 10 bodies…one of which is to get to neutral mind

Leave a Reply